Buenos Aires Metro

Pictures of the historical buildings and environments that make up the city of Buenos
Aires, Argentina and its neighborhoods and information about them. Browse the images below.

 

Buenos Aires is the largest city in Argentina and its Capital. Like the District of Columbia in the United States, Buenos Aires is an autonomous city, neither part of Buenos Aires Province nor its capital. People settled in the area as early as 1524 and the city has a long and storied history.

The Path to Salvation BW

This is the main aisle of the National Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Sheltered

One of the world's homeless on the streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Buenos Aires Walkway

One of the many sidewalks/parks in the median of Aveneda 9 de Julio in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The avenue must be seen to be believed.

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Homeless

This homeless man was sleeping in one of the doorways to the National Cathedral in downtown Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Obelisco de Buenos Aires

The national historical monument Obelisco de Buenos Aires stands 67.5 meters high. Located at the intersection of avenidas Corrientes and Nueve de Julio, it is in the center of the Plaza del la Republica. It was designed by the architect Alberto Prebish and built in 1936 in 31 days.

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Teatro Colon

Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires, Argentina is considered acoustically one of the five best theaters in the world and was inaugurated in 1908 with the Great Italian Lyrical Company performing Verdi's opera Aida. It is one of the three most culturally important structures in Argentina.

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La Casa Rosada

Casa de Gobierno or "House of Government" is also known as "La Casa Rosada" and is the executive mansion and office of the president of Argentina in Buenos Aires. It is said that it was painted baby pink to defuse political tensions between opposing political parties by mixing their colors: the Federales color was red and the unitarians was white. Another explanation was that the original paint was mixed with cows blood to prevent damage from the effects of humidity. It is located at the eastern end of the Plaza de Mayo, a large square in Buenos Aires that dates to 1580.

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The Path to Salvation

This is the main aisle in the National Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Confession

Taken inside the National Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina, this woman has knelt to pray.

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Street Light of Boca

The neighborhood of La Boca in Buenos Aires, Argentina is known for its colorful buildings. The tradition started because the residents couldn"t afford to buy paint to paint their houses and stores, but they were allowed to take whatever paint was left after a ship was painted in the local shipyards. Free paint, but they didn't get to choose the color. Sometimes there wasn't enough of one color to paint a whole building so you ended up with multiple hues. Then the Artists got involved.

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The Blue Path

Wall art in La Boca, Argentina. The area has a strong art tradition.

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A Place To Pray

One apse in the National Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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