Cormorants

To make it easier to picture the double-crested cormorant or the neotropic cormorant in the wild, browse the images below.

 

The double crested cormorant (phalacrocorax auritus) can be found in rivers, lakes and coastlines across the united states from coast to coast, into northern Mexico, central Canada, along the Pacific coast to Alaska and north along the Canadian Atlantic coast. Because they do not tolerate cold weather well, they migrate with the seasons. ​

During the breeding season they get two small crests of black and white feathers on the side of their heads and the facial skin turns more orange.

The double crested cormorant swims and dives for the fish that are the mainstay of their diet. They also eat amphibins and crustaceans that they catch. They may dive as deep as twenty five feet and for as long as thirty to seventy seconds in search of prey.

Beacuse their feathers are not waterproof, you will often see them perched with wings ourspread, drying them in the sun. They spend about half of their time in this manner and the rest in the search of food.

Posing Cormorant

A double-crested cormorant dries itself in the warming sun in Tampa, Florida's Lettuce Lake Park.

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Double Crested Cormorants

These three double crested cormorants were part of a large flock flying through the phosphate pits in wester Polk County, Florida.

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Head First Inspection

This hungry double crested cormorant youngster is checking to make sure that the parent doesn't have anything more for him to eat.

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Success BW

This double-crested cormorant caught itself a snack as it fished beside the Anna Maria Island City Pier on a warm December, 2016 morning in Florida.

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Success

This double-crested cormorant caught itself a snack as it fished beside the Anna Maria Island City Pier on a warm December, 2016 morning in Florida.

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Portrait Of A Cormorant

On a warm, early September 2016 day, a double crested cormorant swims beside the Anna Maria City Pier in Manatee County hoping for a hand out.

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Lazy Bird

On a warm, early September 2016 day, a double crested cormorant swims beside the Anna Maria City Pier in Manatee County hoping for a hand out.

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Migrating Cormorants

These are just a few of the large flock of double-crested cormorants that were flying fom east to west through the phosphate mines in western Polk County, Florida on a bright February morning. Much of this land has been reclaimed and there are many marshes, lakes and ponds that dot the area attracting waterfowl.

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Double Crested Trio

These are just a few of the large flock of double-crested cormorants that were flying fom east to west through the phosphate mines in western Polk County, Florida on a bright February morning. Much of this land has been reclaimed and there are many marshes, lakes and ponds that dot the area attracting waterfowl.

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Immature Double Crested Cormorant

An immature double crested cormorant rests in a mangrove tree on a cloudy day in November in Ruskin Florida's E.G. Simmons Park.

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Neotropic Cormorant

Neotropic cormorant in a tree in the Esteros del Ibera near Colonia Carlos Pelligrini, Argentina.

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